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Behaviour Support Plans, Management Plans & Supports

What is the difference between a Behaviour Support Plan and an Individual Education Plan?

A behaviour support plan is written by a behaviour practitioner and is to be implemented across all settings, including home and other environments. A behaviour support plan is sent to the NDIS Quality and Safeguarding Commission and is to be reviewed on a regular basis. The NDIS funds positive behaviour support in the CB Improved Relationships category.  A student may have a Behaviour Support Plan in place, created by a behaviour practitioner that should be shared with and followed by staff working with the student in their school setting.  A student who has a Behaviour Support Plan may also need an Individual Education Plan, or they might not require an additional IEP.  

An Individual Education Plan is written by the school team following consultation with and input from parents / carers, therapists if appropriate and where possible the student.  The IEP documents the supports or adjustments needed for the student to access teaching and learning, and all other aspects of school life on the same basis as their peers without disability.  If a modified curriculum is required the IEP also documents agreed goals and strategies to achieve these goals.  

What is the difference between a School Behaviour Management Plan, and a Behaviour Support Plan? 

A school behaviour management plan is created by the class teacher or school team and includes strategies that can be used in the school setting to support a student’s behaviour.    Sometimes a behaviour management plan puts the focus on how to “manage” or respond to particular behaviours once they have occurred rather than on all the different supports that need to be put in place to reduce the likelihood of a particular behaviour occurring.   A student who has a behaviour management may also have an IEP, or they may not need an IEP. 

A behaviour support plan is written by a behaviour practitioner and this should be implemented across all settings, including home and other environments. A behaviour support plan is sent to the NDIS Quality and Safeguarding Commission and is to be reviewed on a regular basis. The NDIS funds positive behaviour support in the CB Improved Relationships category. A behaviour support plan should have more focus on understanding the child’s needs that must be met in order for them to feel safe and be able to either self or co-regulate.  A student who has a behaviour support plan may also have an IEP at school, or they might not need an IEP.  

How do I work with my child’s school if I have questions about their behaviour?  

You should always speak to your child’s class teacher about any concerns you have regarding your child’s behaviour or about any behaviour supports provided at school. You are the expert on your child so you will need to pass on relevant information to the teacher. You may discuss different strategies that you have tried, or triggers to avoid, that help your child to stay regulated.

You can also request an advocate attend school meetings with you. If you already have a positive behaviour support plan you can share this with the school. Your behaviour practitioner may also make recommendations to the teacher and may be available for case conferences. If you have not had access to a behaviour practitioner, you can ask your allied health team therapists to attend meetings. We would always recommend you take someone to a meeting with you. 

Advocacy

DDWA has highly experienced advocacy staff who can provide information to support families of school-aged children with disability to stand up for themselves and their child within the educational sector.

Side by Side

DDWA also has a peer support group for families experiencing behaviour which can be seen as challenging.  To find out more about DDWA’s peer support group ‘Side by Side’ click the link below:

https://ddwa.org.au/services/family-peer-support-side-by-side/

Teaching students with disabilities resource

Sometimes it can help to offer supportive resources to your child’s teacher.   The following resource was developed to provide a curated catalogue of useful references and resources to help educators better support students with disability through their leadership and education practices. To access this resource, click the link below:

https://ddwa.org.au/resources/

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